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What's next for Trump after guilty verdict?

Here's how the timeline of events could play out in the coming months.
Donald Trump
Posted at 6:21 PM, May 30, 2024

Former President Donald Trump was found guilty Thursday of 34 felony counts of falsifying business records in his New York hush money trial. But what's next?

Let's examine how the timeline of events could play out in the coming months.

WHEN IS SENTENCING?

The presiding Judge Juan Merchan has scheduled a sentencing date for July 11, but what will come first is known as a pre-sentence report. That's when a division of the court's probation department will likely interview Trump and examine his entire background as a citizen before sending a sentencing recommendation to the judge.

Trump faces up to four years behind bars for each of the 34 counts, which would likely be served concurrently. However, because he has no prior criminal history, there is a scenario in which he doesn't face jail time. Prison is highly unlikely, legal analysts have said.

Instead, Judge Merchan could sentence Trump to home confinement or probation. He could also order the former president to community service, or impose fines.

A demonstrator reacts to the guilty verdict announced against former President Donald Trump outside Manhattan Criminal Court

Trump on Trial

Trump could still vote for himself after guilty verdict if he's not in prison

AP via Scripps News
5:47 PM, May 30, 2024

WHAT WOULD AN APPEAL LOOK LIKE?

There's also the possibility that Trump could request to have his sentencing delayed.

According to legal experts Scripps News spoke with, Trump's attorneys are expected to have about 30 days after a sentence is handed down to notify the court that they wish to appeal a conviction. That will then give them an additional six months to file a legal brief with a New York appellate court explaining on what grounds they wish to appeal.

REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION

The timing of Trump's sentencing date is particularly interesting because it will come just four days before the Republican National Convention that begins on July 15. That's when Republicans will come together in Milwaukee to choose their party's presidential nominee — which is still widely expected to be the former president, even with the guilty verdict.