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Florida Governor Rick Scott unveils new school safety plan after Parkland shooting

Posted: 5:13 AM, Feb 23, 2018
Updated: 2018-02-23 15:46:43-05

Florida Gov. Rick Scott announced a multi-point action plan Friday to make "major changes" to help keep students safe following last week's shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

FULL COVERAGE: Parkland school shooting

During an 11 a.m. news conference, Scott said he wants to use $500 million to improve school safety and mental health.  

The governor said he will be working with the state Legislature over the next two weeks regarding the action plan. 

 

 

His plan includes the following:

  • Require all individuals purchasing firearms to be 21 or older.
  • Mandatory law enforcement officer in every public school. One officer per 1,000 students to be implemented by the start of 2018 school year
  • Mandatory active-shooter drills and code red system
  • Provide $450 million to keep students safe
  • School safety plans must be submitted to their county sheriff’s office by July 1 each year for approval. Once all plans and requests for school hardening have been approved by the county sheriff’s office and local police, plans will be forwarded to the Department of Education by the school district to receive any state funds
  • A new anonymous K-12 "See Something, Say Something" statewide, dedicated hotline, website and mobile app
  • Each school will be required to have a threat assessment team including a teacher, a local law enforcement officer, a human resource officer, a DCF employee, a DJJ employee and the principal to meet monthly to review any potential threats to students and staff at the school
  • Require crisis intervention training for all school personnel. This training must be completed before the start of the 2018 school year.
  • Courts prohibiting mentally ill from purchasing guns
  • $50 million in additional funding for mental health initiatives

The governor held meetings recently with law enforcement, school administrators, teachers, mental health experts and state agency leadership.

Seventeen people were killed in the Feb. 14 shooting in Parkland, Fla., prompting student walkouts and protests across the country this week calling for policy changes.