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Tulsa students bump into protesters at President Donald Trump's Inauguration

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Posted at 9:14 PM, Jan 20, 2017
and last updated 2017-01-20 22:50:07-05

Protestors lined the streets near Capitol Hill. A group of Edison Preparatory students were right in the middle of it as they headed to the inauguration.

Jameson White says it was like nothing she's ever seen before. She said groups of people were harassing and shouting vile phrases at one another, a moment in history she says she'll remember forever.

It's a sight David White says young eyes should see.

"It's real world," he said. "We sometimes live in a little bubble."

White sent his 14-year-old daughter Jameson to Washington D.C. Wednesday to witness history. Little did he know, protests would break out across the city. 

"She starts sending pictures of signs that protestors were carrying," White said. "She was talking about guys that were on megaphones saying some unsavory things. She just said it was terrible."

Jameson says she was shocked at the intensity of the protestors.

"They were mainly just kind of forcing Christianity and how God will save us from all this bad stuff," she said. "There was this sign about how Muslims are like the death of America and all this terribly racist stuff."

"She said one guy said, 'You're all going to hell,'" Jameson's father said. 

"They were saying all this stuff about how Trump can Make America Great Again by banning gay marriage and pro-choice and all these things we've worked hard to attain," the 14-year-old said. 

While the group of 50 Edison students made it to the inauguration, 8th grader Jameson says she'll never forget what she saw on the way.

"Our country has had a lot of problems with racism and it seems like we've come so far, but there is still stuff like that out there and that is what's really sad," she said.

"I think it's just like anything else," David White said. "You can't protect everywhere and it sounds like all the chaos goes on along the path."

Jameson says it's an experience only a few get in a lifetime, but it's something she got to see firsthand.