Timeline look at the history of winter weather events in Oklahoma

We have had some historic ice and snow storms in Green Country.

Going back almost 100 years to January 1920, 11 and a half inches of snow fell in Tulsa.

Over three days in December 1969, a foot of snow accumulated in Okmulgee. Five to 8 inches was measured around Bristow, Okemah and in Tulsa.

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During the second half of December 1983 was one of the worst cold snaps on record with wind chills of 40 to 60 below. The extreme cold caused damage to pipes and many people were without power for days.

In December 1987 the end of the month proved to be very icy. Significant icing occurred near Interstate 44 in northeast Oklahoma. Seventy-five thousand homes were without power, some up to a week. The storm caused $10 million in damage.

February 4, 1996 -  A brutal cold blast hit the region with dangerous morning lows. Vinita recorded 19 below, while it was minus-16 in Claremore. Tulsa dropped to 11 degrees below zero.

On December 9 and 10 in 2007 one of the most destructive ice storms in the state's history struck the area. One to 3 inches of ice accumulated causing power outages for about one million people. Some were without power for a few weeks. The storm caused $600 million in damage.

Winter had a firm grip on Green Country in early February 2011. There was a blizzard on Feb. 1 where 10-15 inches of snow was common. Some areas especially northwest of Tulsa received 18 to 21 inches. Snow drifts of 3-5 feet were the norm. A single storm record of 14 inches fell in Tulsa.

A few days later on Feb. 10, the state record for the lowest temperature of 31 below in Nowata.

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