Muscogee (Creek) Nation council denies vote to manage Broken Arrow's potential Red Clay Casino

BROKEN ARROW, Okla. - A potential Broken Arrow casino received possibly its final blow Tuesday evening.

Muscogee (Creek) Nation leaders decided not to consider plans to manage the controversial property.

Tribal council members voiced their concerns loud and clear, voting 7-2 against it.

Developers of the Red Clay Casino and the Kialegee Tribal Town had asked the Creek Nation to manage the facility and filed an appeal of a judge's previous decision to halt gaming on the land.

If the measure had been approved, Creek Nation would have received 70 percent of the casino's profits, said council member Sam Alexander.

"What the Red Clay group is proposing to the nation is to complete construction of the building, create a turn key operation and turn it over to the nation," said developer Luis Figueredo.

Council members in favor of the partnership argued it would bring jobs and revenue to Creek Nation. Those against it said the tribe's casinos would be competing with each other.

Creek Nation Chief George Tiger gave no clear answer on his opinion.

"Well, it's economic development. As you know, all of you sitting around this table have said you support economic development. So I'll leave it at that," he said.

Council speaker Samuel Alexander says he's not surprised by the outcome.
 
"It says to me that the people of the legislature are ready to move on," he said.

He thinks the controversy from a year ago affected the decision.

"I believe that the anger was directed at all Indians, not just the Kialegee. I believe that all Native Americans in Tulsa were painted with the same brush," Alexander said.

Tiger hopes the two tribes maintain a good relationship.

"Gaming's been good to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. It's an economic development venture. So we just move on," Tiger said.

Council members in favor of the partnership argued it would bring jobs and revenue to Creek Nation. Those against it said the tribe's casinos would be competing with each other.

Creek Nation Chief George Tiger gave no clear answer on his opinion.

"Well, it's economic development. As you know, all of you sitting around this table have said you support economic development. So I'll leave it at that," he said.

Creek Nation Council speaker Samuel Alexander says he's not surprised by the outcome.
 
"It says to me that the people of the legislature are ready to move on," he said.

He thinks the controversy from a year ago affected the decision.

"I believe that the anger was directed at all Indians, not just the Kialegee. I believe that all Native Americans in Tulsa were painted with the same brush," Alexander said.

Tiger hopes the two tribes maintain a good relationship.

"Gaming's been good to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. It's an economic development venture. So we just move on," Tiger said.

Kialegee Town King Tiger Hobia and Red Clay Casino developers were not available for comment following the council decision.

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